GASU ISAAKO FALEAU

Isaako employs 45 cattle to keep the grass down on his 100-acre farm making the coconuts on the ground easier to find. Come dusk and all 45 of his herd can be found in the natural amphitheater near the farms front gate. They wait for Isaako’s return from dropping his staff home from a physical day’s work to relax amongst his cattle. Isaako settles in and with a few gentle calls of ‘o mai’ Samoan for ‘come here’ his cattle and horses make their way to Isaako, some taking turns to nuzzle him while he enjoys a beer and tells them a story or sings them a song.

To get the Isaako’s farm you must travel an hour by ferry to the eastern most island in the Samoan chain of islands, Savaii. Savaii is the biggest of the three main islands, yet the least developed and the least populated due to the lack of a natural deep harbor.

The Faleau plantation has been in the family since the early ancestors arrived in Savaii.

The water that flows through the farm originates through the volcanic rock within the property and the untouched wilderness beyond.

Isaako learnt how to work the land from his father. Isaako recalls that his father could be lost all day in the plantation with nothing to eat or drink but the coconut.

While Isaako has studied and worked on commercial farms in the USA and China his goal was always to come back to the family farm to become the guardian of the family land.

The farm produces 16,000 coconuts a week for market. On the strength of this and his families general store he employs 6 full time staff along with a village of helpers when it comes time to collect the coconuts.

MALUA THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE

Malua is the theological college for the Christian Congregational Church of Samoa. Their 1017 acre planation is supervised by Pule Amosa. It was gifted over 100 years ago by the two neighboring villages to the church for their use.

Pule has 25 years’ experience working for the Ministry of Agriculture in advising farmers on how to plan the planting, control pests and correct cultivation techniques. Having spent time in Asia studying Pule is committed to using each and every aspect of the plant and by products to their potential and nothing is wasted.

Pule now turns his knowledge to managing the Malua plantation, where they cultivate coconuts, black pepper, cassava banana to mention a few. His goal is to make the farm more profitable but also influence the ministers in training how they are able to take this knowledge to their congregations and influence their eating habits for optimum health.

Pule also works with small family farmers to help them reach organic status and find markets for their products. There are also outreach programs to the individual parishes to teach subsistence farming.

MALUA THEOLOGICAL COLLEGE

Malua is the theological college for the Christian Congregational Church of Samoa. Their 1017 acre planation is supervised by Pule Amosa. It was gifted over 100 years ago by the two neighboring villages to the church for their use.

Pule has 25 years’ experience working for the Ministry of Agriculture in advising farmers on how to plan the planting, control pests and correct cultivation techniques. Having spent time in Asia studying Pule is committed to using each and every aspect of the plant and by products to their potential and nothing is wasted.

Pule now turns his knowledge to managing the Malua plantation, where they cultivate coconuts, black pepper, cassava banana to mention a few. His goal is to make the farm more profitable but also influence the ministers in training how they are able to take this knowledge to their congregations and influence their eating habits for optimum health.

Pule also works with small family farmers to help them reach organic status and find markets for their products. There are also outreach programs to the individual parishes to teach subsistence farming.

LEFAGA COMMUNITY FARMERS

LEFAGA COMMUNITY FARMERS

While out production manager Uaea was just a young lad sitting on the bus every Monday morning watching as the large majority of children from the rural areas were bused into town for their schooling he couldn’t but help hard done by to be travelling in the opposite direction to stay with his uncles and aunties. The is the bonds built in those days with his village and family are still strong today.

This is why when we first start our coconut oil Uaea was passionate that our first source of coconuts should be the district of Lefaga.

We work with 12 small family farmers, who we helped to get organic certification. Through a village coordinator we use the bush telegraph o let the farmers know when we are going to collect coconuts.

Sami Leota is one of our community farmers will then set about collecting on their family customary land. Customary land is what each family was gifted when the idea that people could own land was brought to Samoa. It relates to how much land the family cultivated prior to this time.

The Leota family aims to collect 200 nuts in half a day when they go into their plantation. This is the equivalent to $80 and a welcome boost to the family budget. They collect the nuts and store them at a central house for use to collect.

We ask the farmers to husk the nuts at home so it saves us having to dispose of them at the factory, but it also that the family can use it as a source of fire for cooking replacing kerosene thus nothing goes to waste.